Helen Fulton wins Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship

Helen Fulton has been awarded a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship from 2020–2022 to work on a project called ‘Medieval Welsh Political Poetry’.

The project will result in an edition of medieval Welsh poetry that throws light on the politics of Wales and England in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and a study of the Welsh Marcher lord, Sir William Herbert, who played a key role as a Yorkist in the Wars of the Roses. Read more.

York Digital Image Studio Photography

Announcing a new Borders and Borderlands project: Making Bristol Medieval

We’re delighted to announce that Borders and Borderlands has won a grant of £11,173 from the Research and Enterprise Knowledge Exchange fund at the University of Bristol for the project ‘Making Bristol Medieval’.

The aim of the project is to highlight Bristol’s medieval past as a major political and commercial centre with an early interest in the potential of Atlantic trade routes. One of the major outputs of the project is a map of medieval Bristol in the year 1480, to be published in association with the Historic Towns Trust. The project runs from February to July 2020, and the PDRA is Dr Bethany Whalley. Read more.

Border Geographies in Medieval European Writing

Helen Fulton has launched a new international network, ‘Border Geographies in Medieval European Writing’, with funding from the International Strategic Fund from the University of Bristol. The funding enabled Helen to travel to the University of Sydney in June 2019 to talk to colleagues at their Medieval and Early Modern Centre (MEMC).

Helen’s main partner is Dr Jan Shaw, University of Sydney, who visited Bristol as a Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor in April 2018.

Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professorship: Population and Cultural Movement Round the Medieval Atlantic Borderlands

We are pleased to be hosting Professor Benjamin Hudson from Pennsylvania State University at the Centre for Medieval Studies at Bristol from May-June 2019. His visit is funded by a Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professorship, sponsored by the Borders and Borderlands cluster.

Professor Hudson’s project is called ‘Population and Cultural Movement Round the Medieval Atlantic Borderlands’ and he will be delivering a graduate seminar and a public lecture titled ‘The Early History of the Atlantic Ocean: Why Bother?’, on 16 May 2019. Read more.